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Category: Old Times & Old Timers

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Catherin McCarty Antrim

A Mother Whose Son Went Wrong

“[A] lady by instinct and education”

Catherine McCarty (1829-1874), most historians agree, was born in Ireland; but if they agree to that fact, it is about all they agree on concerning the mother of New Mexico’s most famous outlaw: Billy the Kid. (No one knows for sure why Billy used the name Bonney as an alias, but some have suggested that it might have been Catherine’s maiden name.)

She made her way to the United States, probably in the late 1840s.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Giovanni Maria Deagostini

Who was El Ermitaño, & Who Killed Him?

That a man who was called El Solitario or El Ermitaño lived in New Mexico around the middle years of the 19th century is certainly a fact. He was well-known in the Las Vegas area where he lived in the mountains—Hermit’s Peak near town is named for him—and in the Las Cruces/Mesilla area where he lived in a cave in the Organ Mountains east of town.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Historical Society of New Mexico

The Historical Society of New Mexico was created when group of men met in Santa Fe on December 15, 1859. That early date probably makes the Society the oldest west of the Mississippi.

Among those present at that meeting were Colonel John Grayson, Charles P. Clever, Facundo Pino, Jose Guadalupe Gallegos and Kirby Benedict. These were important men: Grayson was a U.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Three Spies Stole Los Alamos Secrets

Not many folks around today remember the name, David Greenglass, and a report of his death at 92 in the Albuquerque media recently likely went unnoticed by most. Even so, he left an indelible mark on 20th century New Mexico history. He was one of the three best known spies at Los Alamos during the 1940s development of the atomic bomb at the Manhattan project there.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

The Crash of the City of San Francisco

The First Overland Domestic Airliner Crash in U. S. History

In 1929, for one wishing to get from New York to California in the shortest time, he or she could make the trip in about two days by way of a very circuitous route that involved both airplane and railroad travel, including an air jaunt across New Mexico.

One first took the overnight train from New York City to Columbus, Ohio.

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by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Sally Rook & the Great Folsom Flood

Certainly one of the biggest news stories in New Mexico during the first decade of the 20th century was the great Folsom flood of 1908. It was a disaster of the first order, but the loss of life might have been much greater had it not been for the heroic acts of a single person: Mrs. Sarah “Sally” Rooke.

It rained a little in the late afternoon of August 27, 1908, but it was nothing out of the ordinary for a summer shower.

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by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Charlie Siringo  – Cowboy / Pinkerton Man / Author

The titles to some books published in the latter part of the 19th century left little to the imagination. One of the most prolix was this: A Texas Cow Boy [sic] or, Fifteen Years on the Hurricane Deck of a Spanish Pony, Taken From Real Life.  The author identified himself as “Chas. A. Siringo, An Old Stove Up ‘Cow Puncher,’ Who has Spent Nearly Twenty Years on The Great Western Cattle Ranges.”

Charles Angelo Siringo was born of Italian/Irish parentage in Matagorda County, in southeast Texas, between Galveston and Corpus Christi about 1856.… Read the rest