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Category: Old Times & Old Timers

During the years of the Great Depression (1929-1940) a number of outlaw gangs roamed around West Texas and eastern New Mexico. Noted killers and bank robbers Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow hid in Carlsbad for a time in 1932 and there was a major gunfight at Bluitt, in Roosevelt County, which resulted in the death of Texas officer Harve Bolin and the severe wounding of Roosevelt County Deputy R. L. Hollis, also in 1932. In July of the following year, another shootout occurred in eastern New Mexico which resulted in two deaths.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

Not long after the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad reached the Las Vegas, New Mexico, area on April 4, 1879, the New Town section was organized into Precinct 29. A grifter and petty thief, some said from St. Louis, named Hyman G. Neill managed to get himself elected justice of the peace and acting coroner. He soon became known as Hoodoo Brown was a sobriquet given to him by a saloon girl who considered Neill bad luck.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

“The Pueblo Revolt of 1680”

By 1680 it had been 140 years since the first Spanish explorers led by Francisco Vázquez de Coronado spent the winters of 1540-41 and 1541-42 near the present day town of Bernalillo, New Mexico. That had not been a happy event for the Pueblo Indian people. They were the victims of a war Coronado waged against them—the Tiguex War—which took many Indian lives.… Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

“The Pueblo Revolt of 1680”

By 1680 it had been 140 years since the first Spanish explorers led by Francisco Vázquez de Coronado spent the winters of 1540-41 and 1541-42 near the present day town of Bernalillo, New Mexico. That had not been a happy event for the Pueblo Indian people. They were the victims of a war Coronado waged against them—the Tiguex War—which took many Indian lives.… Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

The Martyrdom of Padre Juan de Padilla

Padre Juan de Padilla was one four Franciscans, and the only full-fledged priest, to accompany Francisco Vázquez de Coronado on his expedition into New Mexico in 1540. The padre was a native of Andalusia, Spain, but the year of his birth is not known nor is the date of his arrival in the New World. There is documentation showing that he was present in Mexico by 1529.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

Albuquerque’s Indian School

The Albuquerque Indian School (AIS) served the educational needs of Southwestern Native Americans for just a bit more than 100 years; from 1881 to 1982. While much about the institution was controversial, it seems to have benefitted the Indian people much more that it harmed them.

Major B. M. Thomas, United States Pueblo Indian Agent stationed in Santa Fe, proposed an Indian boarding school in 1878.Read the rest

 

by Don Bullis

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

New Mexico Railroads

Railroad traffic in the eastern United States dates back to the late 1820s when rail cars were horse-drawn, often on wooden rails. The first steam powered rail line came into operation about 1830 and after that there was extensive railroading in the eastern United States, notably during the American Civil War (1861-1865) in both the north and the south.Read the rest